computer scientist

William Pugh

IRL Name: 
William Worthington (Bill) Pugh Jr.
Biography: 

William Worthington (Bill) Pugh Jr. is an American computer scientist who invented the skip list and the Omega test for deciding Presburger arithmetic. He was the co-author of the static code analysis tool FindBugs, and was highly influential in the development of the current memory model of the Java language together with his PhD student Jeremy Manson.

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Tony Hoare, C. A. R. Hoare

IRL Name: 
Sir Charles Antony Richard Hoare
Biography: 

Sir Charles Antony Richard Hoare is a British computer scientist best known for the development (in 1960, at age 26) of Quicksort, a well-known sorting algorithm. He also developed Hoare logic for verifying program correctness, and the formal language Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) to specify the interactions of concurrent processes (including the dining philosophers problem) and the inspiration for the occam programming language.

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Pranav Mistry

IRL Name: 
Pranav Mistry
Biography: 

Pranav Mistry is an Indian hardware geek and computer scientist who is famed for inventing SixthSense, a wearable gestural interface device. It is rumored that Facebook tried to acquire the technology from Pranav for a reportedly $2 billion and 5% ownership of Facebook, but Pranav decided to open source it instead. The open source code for the project can be found at SixthSense Google Code and SixthSense Github Repo. The source code is currently being ported into Java from C# to allow the developers to make mobile ports.

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Slug

IRL Name: 
Steve Russell
Biography: 

Steve Russell is a programmer and computer scientist most famous for leading team of programmers that created the first computer video game, Spacewar, while studying at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The game was conceived in 1961 and released in 1962. It took Steve and his team about 200 man-hours to write the first version, which was developed on a DEC (Digital Equipment Corporation) PDP-1 minicomputer.

Steve also wrote the first two implementations of Lisp for the IBM 704 after having a class about the (until then) theoretical language. He invented the continuation to solve a problem for one of the users of his Lisp implementation.

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Stephen Wolfram

IRL Name: 
Stephen Wolfram
Biography: 

Stephen Wolfram was born on August 29, 1959 in London, England, UK. He is a British scientist who is known worldwide as the creator of Mathematica (a widespread computational software) and Wolfram Alpha (a knowledge engine).

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Peter Samson

IRL Name: 
Peter Samson
Biography: 

Peter Samson is an American computer scientist known for creating pioneering computer software. He was born on 1941 at Fitchburg, Massachusetts. While a student at MIT, Peter Samson joined The Model Railroad Club (TMRC) and was introduced to the interactive wonders of the TX-0 and PDP-1 computers. He also wrote the first editions of the TMRC dictionary, predecessor to the Jargon File. Samson developed pioneering software for real-time digital music synthesis for both of these computers, and helped write Spacewar!, including "expensive planetarium,” the star display for Spacewar!

Samson joined Systems Concepts, Inc. in San Francisco in 1970 and became Director of Marketing and Director of Program Development. Here, he programmed the first Chinese-character digital communication system and designed the Systems Concepts Digital Synthesizer, then the world's largest and most capable music synthesizer, which served for more than a decade as principal synthesis engine for the computer music group at Stanford University (CCRMA).

He was in charge of manufacturing engineering for many hardware products, including the Central Memory subsystem for the ILLIAC IV supercomputer complex at the NASA/Ames Research Center. Later he worked for Autodesk, Inc. and contributed significant modules for rendering, animation, Web
browsing, and scripting languages.

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